Churchill: From Canada to the World

Sir Winston Churchill visited Canada on 30 December 1941 to address Senators and Members of Parliament in the House of Commons chamber.

From March-June, 2012, the Library of Parliament in Ottawa hosted a temporary exhibit featuring original pages of what is cited as one of Churchill's greatest wartime speeches "Some chicken! Some neck!" together with the iconic photograph taken by Yousuf Karsh.

Page from Churchill's speech to the Canadian Parliament, 30 December 1941.

Reference: Churchill Papers, CHAR 9/153/97. Reproduced by permission of Curtis Brown, London, on behalf of the Estate of Winston S. Churchill.

Opening of the exhibition at the Library of Parliament, with Andrew Scheer, Speaker of the House of Commons, Sonia L'Heureux, Associate Parliamentary Librarian and Allen Packwood, Director, Churchill Archives Centre. Opening of the exhibition at the Library of Parliament. Display case containing archival papers and objects

Opening of the exhibition at the Library of Parliament, with Andrew Scheer, Speaker of the House of Commons, Sonia L'Heureux, Associate Parliamentary Librarian and Allen Packwood, Director, Churchill Archives Centre.

Statement made in the Canadian Parliament on the opening of the exhibition, by Mr Pierre Poilièvre (Nepean-Carleton, CPC):

"Mr. Speaker, 70 years ago, as Europe teetered on the brink of Nazi evil, Winston Churchill stood only a few feet from where you now sit, at which time he addressed this House with his famous "Some chicken; some neck" speech. In it he declared:

'Canada is a potent magnet, drawing together those in the new world and in the old whose fortunes are now united in a deadly struggle for life and honour against the common foe.'

Today, until the end of June, the parliamentary library showcases select pages, audio and video clips of this inspirational speech and a signed copy of Karsh's iconic photograph of Churchill.

It is an occasion to celebrate the man who published 41 books, who fought, was captured and escaped during the Boer War, who helped defend the free world against Nazism and who woke America to the Soviet threat with his famous "Iron Curtain" speech at Fulton.

Let us celebrate Winston Churchill, defender of the free world and the greatest parliamentarian of the 20th century."

Read Mr Poilièvre's statement in the Official Record of the Canadian Parliament (at 1415)