Faith in Politics Conference 2013

A forum to discuss, debate and offer analysis on the role that faith plays in contemporary politics of multicultural Britain.

Faith in Politics Conference 2013

A forum to discuss, debate and offer analysis on the role that faith plays in contemporary politics of multicultural Britain.

The Faith in Politics Conference hosted by the Churchill Archives Centre (in association with the Cambridge Public Policy and the Woolf Institute) became a forum for politicians, academics, diplomats, clergy and international foundation representatives to discuss, debate and offer analysis on the role that faith plays in contemporary politics of multicultural Britain.

While the majority of the action took place in Churchill College’s Wolfson Hall, the conference was live tweeted and sent ripples of debate through the twittersphere. Over the two day conference, the panels set out to address major themes during the conference such as to what extent the state should be secular, to what extent religion should be involved in politics, and what impacts a secular code of ethics might have on the current political landscape.

The first day focused on the contemporary interplay of faith and politics. How the multicultural nature of British faith is changing and how that alters the context of political decisions, how religious issues of the twentieth century continue to shape public opinion and policy, and defining the legitimate role for Churches and of faith based foundations in public policy were major questions which were posed. Baroness Warsi’s keynote made an impression (both in the conference and on Twitter) as she remained resolute in the belief that ‘faith is at the heart of British politics.’

The second day offered more reflection on how faith had influenced British policy in the past, how the role of religion in Britain might be compared to Europe or the United States and how faith might continue to play a role in British foreign and domestic policy in the future. Specific reoccurring issues surrounding faith based education, the position of Bishops in the House of Lords, the nature of media coverage and representations of faith as well as comparisons between Britain and the United States and Europe were major currents of discourse thought out both days of conference.

While the conference obviously could not solve the issues reviewed during its sessions, it was felt to be a major success in that it brought several strands of thinkers, policy makers and believers together to exchange ideas , consider their positions, and reflect on the nature of faith in politics.

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The views expressed are the views of the speakers and contributors alone, and are not endorsed or otherwise by Churchill College in any way whatsoever.

Introduction

Why should the Churchill Archives Centre host a conference on faith and politics?

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Introduction

Why should the Churchill Archives Centre host a conference on faith and politics?

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Panels

The views expressed are the views of the speakers and contributors alone, and are not endorsed or otherwise by Churchill College in any way whatsoever.

Understanding religious diversity

An introductory panel to help set the frame work for the other panels and subsequent discussions — exploring the concepts of religious identity and memory.

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The Recent Past & Its Impact Today

Analysis on key areas of tension in the 20th century and how they shape contemporary policy making and opinion.

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Exploring the Role of Religion in Multi-cultural Britain

Exploring the legitimate role of the church and faith groups in policy making and public life and the limitations and benefits of this relationship.

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The Role of Religion in Shaping Western Foreign Policy in the 20th Century

By retracing British policies from the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries, this panel examined the nature of relationship between religion and foreign policy.

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The Role of Religion in Making Foreign Policy in the 21st Century

This panel considers the effects of religion in the making for Foreign policy in 21st century.

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Beyond Our Borders: A Comparison with America and Europe

This panel took a comparative approach to the relationship between religion and government by comparing and contrasting the English model with the American and European models.

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Hosts & Convenors

Sir David Wallace CBE FRS FREng

Master of Churchill College, University of Cambridge.

Biography
Dr Edward Kessler MBE

Founder and Executive Director of the Woolf Institute.

Biography
Professor Alex Oliver

Representing Cambridge Public Policy, Professor in Philosophy, Cambridge 

Biography
Allen Packwood

Fellow of Churchill College & Director of the Churchill Archives Centre.

Biography
Dr Warren Dockter

Junior Research Fellow, Clare Hall, University of Cambridge.

Biography

Sponsors & Thanks

Individuals and organisations whose generous support made this conference possible.

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Sponsors & Thanks

Individuals and organisations whose generous support made this conference possible.

Details