Statement from the Vice-Chancellor of the University of Cambridge on the result of the EU Referendum

24th June 2016 in News and Events

"We recognise that there is a great deal of uncertainty around the decision to leave the European Union. We would like to reassure our staff that a University working group has met this afternoon following the referendum result and various work streams are underway looking at staff, students, post docs, partnerships and nationality issues. I would like to stress again that, even though the result is in favour of leaving the European Union, there is no immediate change to the University’s teaching, research and other activities. We will continue to work as normal.

It is not currently known what the impact of leaving the EU will have on UK policy on higher education tuition fees, loans and bursaries. However, the University can confirm that undergraduate EU students who are already studying at Cambridge, who have an offer to study at Cambridge, or who apply in 2016 to start their studies in 2017, will continue to be charged the UK fee rate applicable at the time, provided this continues to be permitted by UK law. Please note that the UK fee rate may be subject to increases, which may be annual.

The University will work with the Government to ensure it takes steps to ensure that staff and students from the EU can continue to work and study in this country. Cambridge thrives as part of a wide international community of academic staff and students, and we remain deeply committed to global cooperation and our dedicated staff who come from all over the world.

As I said this morning, there is work underway to consider how best to communicate internal developments with specific members of the University. Further information will be available next week on the University’s website.

You may also be interested to read University UK’s latest statement on the referendum result:

“Leaving the EU will create significant challenges for universities. Although this is not an outcome that we wished or campaigned for, we respect the decision of the UK electorate. We should remember that leaving the EU will not happen overnight, there will be a gradual exit process with significant opportunities to seek assurances and influence future policy.

Throughout the transition period our focus will be on securing support that allows our universities to continue to be global in their outlook, internationally networked and an attractive destination for talented people from across Europe. These features are central to ensuring that British universities continue to be the best in the world.

Our first priority will be to convince the UK Government to takes steps to ensure that staff and students from EU countries can continue to work and study at British universities and to promote the UK as a welcoming destination for the brightest and best minds. They make a powerful contribution to university research and teaching and have a positive impact on the British economy and society. We will also prioritise securing opportunities for our researchers and students to access vital pan-European programmes and build new global networks.”

— L K Borysiewicz, Vice-Chancellor, University of Cambridge

Earlier statement

“We note this result with disappointment. My position on this issue is well known, but 52 per cent of voters in the referendum disagreed. We will work with our partners in business, research and academia, as well as our European partners and the government, to understand the implications of this outcome."

 

First published on the University of Cambridge website on 24 June 2016.

Share